Andy Warhol

Perrier

Apples

Liz

Souper Dress

Flowers II.116

Marilyn Invitation Card (Castelli Gallery)

Perrier
Perrier


Edition: Open edition
Medium: Color Offset Lithograph on graphic art paper
Signature: Plate signed
Unframed Dimensions: 23.75 x 17.5 inches
Framed Dimensions: 29.5 x 23.5 inches
Year: 1983

Apples
Apples


Edition: /150
Medium: Screenprint on Lenox Museum Board
Signature: Signed & numbered lower left
Unframed Dimensions: 30 x 40 inches
Framed Dimensions: 34 x 44 inches
Series: Space Fruit: Still Lifes
Year: 1979

Liz
Liz


Edition: 300
Medium: Offset Lithograph on paper
Signature: Signed in ball-point pen
Unframed Dimensions: 23.125 x 23.125 inches
Framed Dimensions: 31.25 x 31.25 inches
Year: 1964

Souper Dress
Souper Dress


Edition: Unknown
Medium: Silkscreen on cotton and cellulose dress
Signature: Unsigned
Unframed Dimensions: 37.25 x 23.5 inches
Framed Dimensions: 44 x 28.5 inches
Year: 1966-67

Flowers II.116
Flowers II.116


Edition: /250
Medium: Screenprint on Arches
Signature: Pencil signed lower right and on verso
Unframed Dimensions: 40.875 x 27.25 inches
Framed Dimensions: 47.5 x 33.75 inches
Year: 1974

Marilyn Invitation Card (Castelli Gallery)
Marilyn Invitation Card (Castelli Gallery)


Edition: Approx 250
Medium: Screenprint
Signature: Unsigned
Unframed Dimensions: 7 x 14 inches
Framed Dimensions: 12.5 x 19.5 inches
Year: 1981

Biography

He was one of the most enigmatic figures in American art. His work became the definitive expression of a culture obsessed with images. He was surrounded by a coterie of beautiful bohemians with names like Viva, Candy Darling, and Ultra Violet. He held endless drug- and sex-filled parties, through which he never stopped working. He single-handedly confounded the distinctions between high and low art. His films are pivotal in the formation of contemporary experimental art and pornography. He spent the final years of his life walking around the posh neighborhoods of New York with a plastic bag full of hundred dollar bills, buying jewelry and knick knacks. His name was Andy Warhol, and he changed the nature of art forever.

During Warhol's extended convalescence he began to work on a new mode of art. Considered his "Post-Pop" period, the images were primarily portraits of living superstars. Throughout the '70s and '80s, Warhol produced hundreds of portraits, mostly in silk screen. His images of Liza Minnelli, Jimmy Carter, Albert Einstein, Elizabeth Taylor, and Philip Johnson express a more subtle and expressionistic side of his work. During the final years of his life, Warhol became the hero of another generation of artists, including Keith Haring, Jean-Michel Basquiat, and Francesco Clemente. Their work represents a continuation of an artistic revolution begun by Andy Warhol. On February 22, 1987, Warhol died of heart failure at his home in New York. Many suggested it was a poorly performed minor surgery he had had earlier that day, while others believed it was due to the general weakening of his body after the shooting. What remains certain is that during the sixty years of whirlwind and mystery that was Andy Warhol's life, the art world (and the world at large) became a more fun and interesting place.